Look there! the Christ, our Brother, comes

Look there! the Christ, our Brother, comes
resplendent from the gallows tree
and what he brings in his hurt hands
is life on life for you and me.

Refrain:
Joy! joy! joy to the heart all in this good day’s dawning.
Joy! joy! joy to the heart all in this good day’s dawning.

Good Jesus Christ inside his pain
looked down Golgotha’s stony slope
and let the blood flow from his flesh
to fill the springs of living hope. Refrain

Good Jesus Christ, our Brother, died
in darkest hurt upon the tree
to offer us the worlds of light
that live inside the Trinity. Refrain

Look there! the Christ, our Brother, comes
resplendent from the gallows tree
and what he brings in his hurt hands
is life on life for you and me. Refrain

This amazing text was written in 1980 by John Bennett. My favorite hymn tune for this is K. Lee Scott’s tune TILTON. His setting of this hymn can be found in Rejoice in God.

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About revjatb

I am a father of six who is trying to do his best! My interests are varied. I have one blog, KnowTea, that is primarily focused on liturgy and worship and another one, Bengtsson's Baking, that is about, well, baking! I hope you enjoy both of them, and if you have any questions, please contact me!
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7 Responses to Look there! the Christ, our Brother, comes

  1. vrouw_jonker says:

    Have we missed the Sunday when this was sung at JKPC?

  2. RevJATB says:

    Alas, we have not sung this one. We won’t unless and until we have an organist. And a choir wouldn’t hurt. 🙂

  3. Tim M. says:

    It’s in the Hymnal l1982 (Episcopal) with a tune called “Petrus”, pretty bouncy, and we sing it every Easter!

  4. Tom Rambo says:

    The tune “Petrus” is wonderfully jazzy and is just perfect for Easter with these words. You can have the whole congregation swinging!

  5. ms. marty reimer says:

    does anyone know a youtube or other site where someone has uploaded a recording of this being sung? i discovered it in an episcopal hymnal and love the words, but am not musical enough to play it and figure out how it should sound. thanks

  6. Pingback: Seven weeks of Easter hymns! (Part III) | Know Tea

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